The most common reason for UNE's rejection of applications for a study permit is that we do not believe that the applicant will go home after he/she concludes his/her studies. We also reject applications if the applicant cannot provide for him/herself in Norway or if we do not believe that the purpo

UNE rarely reverses the UDI's decisions. In the cases where we do reverse the UDI's decision, it is usually because we have received new documentation and new information which means we take a different view of the case than the UDI.

What do we consider?

UNE rejects many cases because we do not believe that the applicant will go home after he/she concludes his/her studies. One example is applicants who come from a country from which many apply for asylum in Norway.

We also reject many cases because the applicant is unable to provide for him/herself in Norway. It is a requirement that the applicant has financial means corresponding to the rates of the Norwegian State Educational Loan Fund and that this money is at his/her own disposal. A number of applicants do not meet this requirement.

We also reject some cases if we do not believe that the purpose of coming to Norway is to study full-time, for example if the applicant has previously worked extensively in addition to his/her studies. Some people apply for a study permit after having received several rejections of applications for a residence permit, for example residence for the purpose of working in Norway. This could result in UNE not believing that the purpose of the stay is to study.

Some people are behind in their studies when they apply for renewal. That may be a reason for rejecting an application. Other people may have switched academic fields, without the new study programme being a continuation of the programme they first started. That may also be a reason for rejecting an application.

You can read more about the conditions for being granted a study permit on the UDI's website (external link).

UNE rarely reverses the UDI's decisions. In the cases where we do reverse the UDI's decision, it is usually because we have received new documentation and new information which means we take a different view of the case than the UDI.

In some cases, the applicant may meet all the requirements for being granted a study permit. We can nevertheless reject the application because we do not believe the applicant will return home after his/her studies are concluded. The rules state that a study permit does not form the basis for permanent residence in Norway. This means that we must assess whether the applicant will actually leave Norway once his/her study permit expires. Some applicants come from countries that many people leave to apply for asylum in Europe. In such cases, it will take a lot for us to find it likely that the applicant will return home.

If you submitted your application for renewal of your study permit to the police within one month of the expiry of your previous permit, you are entitled to stay in Norway on exactly the same terms until UNE has considered your case.

If you applied later than one month before your previous permit expired, but the UDI has granted you deferred implementation, you must contact the UDI to find out what this means for you. This is because you are not entitled to stay here on the same terms as before. You may have been allowed to stay in Norway, but not to work here.

As a student, you can work 20 hours a week and full-time during holidays. If you work more than this, your study permit may not be renewed. You can also be expelled from Norway and the Schengen area. Being expelled means that you cannot enter Norway or the Schengen area.

We will consider your case even if you go home in the meantime. You can only return to Norway if you have been granted permission to do so.